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  • Birds and Words | A Somewhat Birder and a Writer
    wren by its song which seemed like nothing short of a miracle to me A Carolina Wren later bewitched us with its song and a Gray Catbird Dumetella carolinensis let out chatty squirrel like calls nearby I caught a Warbling vireo s burbling warbling song and then we were rewarded with great looks at a Nashville warbler a Wilson s warbler and a Magnolia warbler all fluttering about in the low shrubs for a few minutes And just like that within moments I forgot about the dire heat For a moment everything seemed in order exactly as it should be September is a wonderful but slightly melancholy month for me These are the last sightings we ll have of warblers before they make their perilous journey south A good bye of sorts And yet this year I m seeing more I m recognizing a few more songs I m noticing a few more plumage details It s slow this birding knowledge acquisition but it s marvellous A year ago I couldn t have told you a bird was wren like and I certainly wouldn t have thought to pay attention to a greyish drab warbling vireo s bright eyestripe that now looks to me like rebellious eye shadow and brings me right back to those trips to the mall in 7th grade and all those unfortunate but oh so earnest experiments in make up Is it wrong to see myself in these birds To recognize pieces of my life Because perhaps what s happening is that birds have unexpectedly completely unintentionally turned into an inextricable part of me In other good news a piece I wrote about migratory restlessness Zugunruhe both birdy and personal has been long listed for the CBC Creative Nonfiction award Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing on September 6 2015 by Julia Zarankin Back from the land of Arctic Terns by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply Dearest Birdiest Readers I m back from two weeks in Iceland and am trying to figure out how to readjust to Toronto life where the weather doesn t change drastically every couple of hours where the northern light doesn t blind you at 8pm in late August where I can t sip a delicious latte in a cowshed cafe Yes you read those last words correctly We discovered Iceland s best cafe located in a bona fide cowshed about 10 km south of Akureyri Where else in the world could we sip lattes and eat waffles with fresh cream whilst surrounded by 200 cows going about their somewhat smelly business We even watched the milking process via webcam and it was nothing short of riveting yes our portion of the cafe was glassed in Here are the lovelies at KaffiKu Not your usual coffee shop Many great black backed gulls flying overhead above the barn It s not easy to readjust to a landscape with trees with more than one lane of traffic with crowds of people I seemed to have no problem getting used to the miles of lava fields volcanic rock covered in thick moss and to the near constant crisply harsh sounds of arctic terns overhead I miss being surrounded by ocean I miss the omnipresent geothermal swimming pools we tried out eight different ones if you re planning a trip to Iceland I have plenty of advice I miss the delicious vinarbraud custard and almond croissants of which I consumed at least two every single day I miss the herring sadly we didn t make it to the national herring museum I miss the colossal sky and fabulously fickle weather I miss Icelandic non nonsense ways and absence of garrulous often meaningless politeness I miss it all Perhaps if I m being brutally honest I also miss being on vacation In birdier news I was proud of my modest ID skills that I managed to exercise we saw Kittiwakes Oystercatchers White wagtails a gazillion great back backed gulls and shore birds of every persuasion but I was scope less not to mention skill less in the shore bird department and couldn t ID much of anything I studied the birds I knew and contented myself with that I did have one unexpected birdy experience While visiting Halldor Laxness house museum Gljufrasteinn I happened on the most lovely sight in his bedroom Right there on the windowsill across from his bed lay a pair of Zeiss binoculars which Laxness used every single day of his life I was alone in the museum and probably proceeded to do something semi legal I picked up the binoculars and took a look through his mid century Zeiss optics to catch a glimpse of the world his ancestral hills mountains and fields exactly as Halldor Laxness saw it And to think that five years ago I wouldn t have even noticed the binoculars they would have meant as little to me as the religious paraphernalia on the bedside table Halldor Laxness Zeiss binoculars Gljufrasteinn museum How delightfully strange life is How miraculously unexpected its twists and turns Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Uncategorized on August 30 2015 by Julia Zarankin Meanwhile with birds by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply It s been hard to find the words Or rather I ve been searching for and sifting through words about my relationship with birds elsewhere of late If anything comes of my meandering thoughts I ll let you know So we ll save the big picture discussions for another time and I ll let you know what s been happening in the meanwhile Where to begin I could tell you about my catastrophic ID experience a few weeks ago wherein I accidentally called a Green heron a Hummingbird yes I did admit that the hummingbird seemed exceedingly large for some reason or all the

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/ (2015-09-25)
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  • About Me | Birds and Words
    and attributes a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em i q cite s strike strong Notify me of follow up comments by email Notify me of new posts by email Search for On the Coyot es Network Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Coyote Crossing Published on September 19 2015 by Chris Clarke My Hit Single Are Warblers Less Important Than Tigers Reconciliation Ecology Published on September 12 2015 by Madhusudan Katti Making Friends With Crows The Corvid Blog Published on August 2 2015 by The Corvid Blog The Heart of Freedom Cecil the Lion Wild Within Published on July 29 2015 by Jennifer Molidor There s Gold in Them Hills Dispersal Range Published on June 28 2015 by Meera Lee Sethi California note 1 Slow Water Movement Published on July 7 2015 by slowwatermovement Joe Eaton calls Fowl A Review Toad In The Hole Published on July 4 2015 by Joe Eaton The other invisible hand View from Elephant Hills Published on 5 June 2015 by T R Shankar Raman The Silurian Valley spared but will it be conserved Miracle or Mirage Published on December 5 2014 by Patrick Donnelly Lone Pine s lone pine Is Dead InyoOwnWay Published on August 13 2014 by Mike Prather A Good Defense Is Not Enough The Not Essential List Published on August 18 2013 by Shaun G Nevada Part 2 Basin and Range Watch Published on July 17 2013 by Basin and Range Watch Recent Posts On Forgetting My Field Guide And Just Like That Beginnings of Fall Back from the land of Arctic Terns Meanwhile with birds Recent Comments Julia Zarankin on On Forgetting My Field Guide Alison on On Forgetting My Field Guide Julia Zarankin on Happiness creeky on

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/sample-page/ (2015-09-25)
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  • Birding | Birds and Words
    will keep trying to grasp at the words but in the meanwhile here s a photo that pretty much says it all I m holding a Bufflehead at the banding station at Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station the piece of Toronto paradise where I volunteer with a stupid grin on my face for most of the day even and especially when I m scribing which has turned out to be the most senselessly thrilling part of spring and fall We banded the bird and shortly after posing for this photo I released him by hurling him into the air over a half freezing patch of Lake Ontario And off he flew out of sight Here I am holding a Bufflehead Photo by Charlotte England And look my hat matches the Bufflehead s plumage What a presentiment I must have had while picking out my outfit and rifling through my closet at 5am As I said senselessly happy Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing and tagged banding station binoculars ducks outdoors Zeiss on April 19 2015 by Julia Zarankin Again for a day by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply It s spring here in Toronto The snow has been gone for weeks now and what amazes me is how faraway winter now feels As if I ve forgotten how to be in winter now that spring has arrived My boots feel enormous my parka unwieldy my scarves and hats unwittingly crowd me it s over the weather patterns tell me And I consent My body has fully committed to spring And then my bird group decides to drive three hours north of the city to spend the day in Algonquin park in Boreal forest heartland and suddenly we re navigating snow squalls and it s winter all over again and I have to re acclimatize to this season that I ve almost entirely forgotten existed This season that just was a mere two weeks ago and now feels like a distant memory How we are all creatures of weather it turns out We walked snow covered paths sometimes falling inwards knee deep in search of a Boreal chickadee Poecile hudsonicus and found not one but two The boreal resembles the ubiquitous Black capped chickadee but has a browner head and greyer face and its song feels more drawn out Put differently the Black capped chickadee sings a Boreal chickadee song in double time with more staccato to it Here s the Boreal Chickadee Photo by Daniel Arndt from here We continued along the paths desperate for a displaying Spruce grouse The grouse must have laughed as he no doubt saw us meandering through the woods freezing slightly walking single file positioning one foot cautiously inside the footstep in front of us and then the next so as not to collapse into snow He must have chuckled as we searched for him so earnestly in silence so convinced we were that we d find him It was not to be But to reward us for our diligence we got a Grey Jay unexpectedly since most of them are nesting this time of year And a beaver in lieu of a moose also brightened up the day I ve never seen Common redpolls with as brilliant a sliver of red almost as if they had donned red Cardinals baseball caps Illuminated by the sun they looked radiant We also got a merlin lots of Turkey vultures Hairy and Downy woodpeckers a somewhat athletic red breasted nuthatch and a glistening iridescent common grackle The morning began with spring turned rapidly to winter for the better part of a day I was underdressed wore the wrong boots forgot my long underwear before reverting back to vernal climes Strange disorienting climactic shifts but it felt invigorating to re experience winter for a day In all honesty now that I ve moved on to anticipating warblers I didn t realized how much I missed winter Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing and tagged binoculars fashion persistence warblers Zeiss on April 11 2015 by Julia Zarankin Pondering the Nature of Things by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply Sometimes the pursuit of birds is easier than one would imagine Last week for instance we started off the morning by finding the illustrious and oftentimes elusive Histrionicus histrionics otherwise known as the Harlequin duck within minutes of arriving at Gairloch Gardens in Oakville We spent about ten minutes marvelling at his plumage that looks as if was hand painted by a gifted stylist and watched him swim further and further away from us out into the depths of Lake Ontario as if saying that s enough of a beautiful spectacle for now Too many great looks at a Harlequin could render one smug Usually you have to work much harder to find this kind of beauty And off he went We too departed soon after though a group of Common Goldeneyes regaled us with a fabulous courtship display which involved some exquisite backward neck stretching moves And off we went in search of our next target bird Within an hour we managed to find the Neotropic Cormorant amidst about 500 Double crested cormorants The fetching Neotropic variety is slightly smaller than the others and has white on its bill rather than the more common yellow on the double crested Needless to say I wouldn t have been able to find this one on my own but I was in the company of birdy geniuses who immediately detected a species whose size merited a second look Meanwhile I was busy watching the cormorants flying over the water with bits of supplies in their bill heading toward the trees for nest building rituals A few minutes later we saw our first tree swallows of the year and decided that spring had

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/category/birding/ (2015-09-25)
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  • Life | Birds and Words
    will keep trying to grasp at the words but in the meanwhile here s a photo that pretty much says it all I m holding a Bufflehead at the banding station at Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station the piece of Toronto paradise where I volunteer with a stupid grin on my face for most of the day even and especially when I m scribing which has turned out to be the most senselessly thrilling part of spring and fall We banded the bird and shortly after posing for this photo I released him by hurling him into the air over a half freezing patch of Lake Ontario And off he flew out of sight Here I am holding a Bufflehead Photo by Charlotte England And look my hat matches the Bufflehead s plumage What a presentiment I must have had while picking out my outfit and rifling through my closet at 5am As I said senselessly happy Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing and tagged banding station binoculars ducks outdoors Zeiss on April 19 2015 by Julia Zarankin Again for a day by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply It s spring here in Toronto The snow has been gone for weeks now and what amazes me is how faraway winter now feels As if I ve forgotten how to be in winter now that spring has arrived My boots feel enormous my parka unwieldy my scarves and hats unwittingly crowd me it s over the weather patterns tell me And I consent My body has fully committed to spring And then my bird group decides to drive three hours north of the city to spend the day in Algonquin park in Boreal forest heartland and suddenly we re navigating snow squalls and it s winter all over again and I have to re acclimatize to this season that I ve almost entirely forgotten existed This season that just was a mere two weeks ago and now feels like a distant memory How we are all creatures of weather it turns out We walked snow covered paths sometimes falling inwards knee deep in search of a Boreal chickadee Poecile hudsonicus and found not one but two The boreal resembles the ubiquitous Black capped chickadee but has a browner head and greyer face and its song feels more drawn out Put differently the Black capped chickadee sings a Boreal chickadee song in double time with more staccato to it Here s the Boreal Chickadee Photo by Daniel Arndt from here We continued along the paths desperate for a displaying Spruce grouse The grouse must have laughed as he no doubt saw us meandering through the woods freezing slightly walking single file positioning one foot cautiously inside the footstep in front of us and then the next so as not to collapse into snow He must have chuckled as we searched for him so earnestly in silence so convinced we were that we d find him It was not to be But to reward us for our diligence we got a Grey Jay unexpectedly since most of them are nesting this time of year And a beaver in lieu of a moose also brightened up the day I ve never seen Common redpolls with as brilliant a sliver of red almost as if they had donned red Cardinals baseball caps Illuminated by the sun they looked radiant We also got a merlin lots of Turkey vultures Hairy and Downy woodpeckers a somewhat athletic red breasted nuthatch and a glistening iridescent common grackle The morning began with spring turned rapidly to winter for the better part of a day I was underdressed wore the wrong boots forgot my long underwear before reverting back to vernal climes Strange disorienting climactic shifts but it felt invigorating to re experience winter for a day In all honesty now that I ve moved on to anticipating warblers I didn t realized how much I missed winter Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing and tagged binoculars fashion persistence warblers Zeiss on April 11 2015 by Julia Zarankin Pondering the Nature of Things by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply Sometimes the pursuit of birds is easier than one would imagine Last week for instance we started off the morning by finding the illustrious and oftentimes elusive Histrionicus histrionics otherwise known as the Harlequin duck within minutes of arriving at Gairloch Gardens in Oakville We spent about ten minutes marvelling at his plumage that looks as if was hand painted by a gifted stylist and watched him swim further and further away from us out into the depths of Lake Ontario as if saying that s enough of a beautiful spectacle for now Too many great looks at a Harlequin could render one smug Usually you have to work much harder to find this kind of beauty And off he went We too departed soon after though a group of Common Goldeneyes regaled us with a fabulous courtship display which involved some exquisite backward neck stretching moves And off we went in search of our next target bird Within an hour we managed to find the Neotropic Cormorant amidst about 500 Double crested cormorants The fetching Neotropic variety is slightly smaller than the others and has white on its bill rather than the more common yellow on the double crested Needless to say I wouldn t have been able to find this one on my own but I was in the company of birdy geniuses who immediately detected a species whose size merited a second look Meanwhile I was busy watching the cormorants flying over the water with bits of supplies in their bill heading toward the trees for nest building rituals A few minutes later we saw our first tree swallows of the year and decided that spring had

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/category/life/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • seeing | Birds and Words
    will keep trying to grasp at the words but in the meanwhile here s a photo that pretty much says it all I m holding a Bufflehead at the banding station at Tommy Thompson Park Bird Research Station the piece of Toronto paradise where I volunteer with a stupid grin on my face for most of the day even and especially when I m scribing which has turned out to be the most senselessly thrilling part of spring and fall We banded the bird and shortly after posing for this photo I released him by hurling him into the air over a half freezing patch of Lake Ontario And off he flew out of sight Here I am holding a Bufflehead Photo by Charlotte England And look my hat matches the Bufflehead s plumage What a presentiment I must have had while picking out my outfit and rifling through my closet at 5am As I said senselessly happy Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing and tagged banding station binoculars ducks outdoors Zeiss on April 19 2015 by Julia Zarankin Again for a day by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply It s spring here in Toronto The snow has been gone for weeks now and what amazes me is how faraway winter now feels As if I ve forgotten how to be in winter now that spring has arrived My boots feel enormous my parka unwieldy my scarves and hats unwittingly crowd me it s over the weather patterns tell me And I consent My body has fully committed to spring And then my bird group decides to drive three hours north of the city to spend the day in Algonquin park in Boreal forest heartland and suddenly we re navigating snow squalls and it s winter all over again and I have to re acclimatize to this season that I ve almost entirely forgotten existed This season that just was a mere two weeks ago and now feels like a distant memory How we are all creatures of weather it turns out We walked snow covered paths sometimes falling inwards knee deep in search of a Boreal chickadee Poecile hudsonicus and found not one but two The boreal resembles the ubiquitous Black capped chickadee but has a browner head and greyer face and its song feels more drawn out Put differently the Black capped chickadee sings a Boreal chickadee song in double time with more staccato to it Here s the Boreal Chickadee Photo by Daniel Arndt from here We continued along the paths desperate for a displaying Spruce grouse The grouse must have laughed as he no doubt saw us meandering through the woods freezing slightly walking single file positioning one foot cautiously inside the footstep in front of us and then the next so as not to collapse into snow He must have chuckled as we searched for him so earnestly in silence so convinced we were that we d find him It was not to be But to reward us for our diligence we got a Grey Jay unexpectedly since most of them are nesting this time of year And a beaver in lieu of a moose also brightened up the day I ve never seen Common redpolls with as brilliant a sliver of red almost as if they had donned red Cardinals baseball caps Illuminated by the sun they looked radiant We also got a merlin lots of Turkey vultures Hairy and Downy woodpeckers a somewhat athletic red breasted nuthatch and a glistening iridescent common grackle The morning began with spring turned rapidly to winter for the better part of a day I was underdressed wore the wrong boots forgot my long underwear before reverting back to vernal climes Strange disorienting climactic shifts but it felt invigorating to re experience winter for a day In all honesty now that I ve moved on to anticipating warblers I didn t realized how much I missed winter Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing and tagged binoculars fashion persistence warblers Zeiss on April 11 2015 by Julia Zarankin Pondering the Nature of Things by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply Sometimes the pursuit of birds is easier than one would imagine Last week for instance we started off the morning by finding the illustrious and oftentimes elusive Histrionicus histrionics otherwise known as the Harlequin duck within minutes of arriving at Gairloch Gardens in Oakville We spent about ten minutes marvelling at his plumage that looks as if was hand painted by a gifted stylist and watched him swim further and further away from us out into the depths of Lake Ontario as if saying that s enough of a beautiful spectacle for now Too many great looks at a Harlequin could render one smug Usually you have to work much harder to find this kind of beauty And off he went We too departed soon after though a group of Common Goldeneyes regaled us with a fabulous courtship display which involved some exquisite backward neck stretching moves And off we went in search of our next target bird Within an hour we managed to find the Neotropic Cormorant amidst about 500 Double crested cormorants The fetching Neotropic variety is slightly smaller than the others and has white on its bill rather than the more common yellow on the double crested Needless to say I wouldn t have been able to find this one on my own but I was in the company of birdy geniuses who immediately detected a species whose size merited a second look Meanwhile I was busy watching the cormorants flying over the water with bits of supplies in their bill heading toward the trees for nest building rituals A few minutes later we saw our first tree swallows of the year and decided that spring had

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/category/seeing/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Julia Zarankin | Birds and Words
    not Winter or Carolina wren by its song which seemed like nothing short of a miracle to me A Carolina Wren later bewitched us with its song and a Gray Catbird Dumetella carolinensis let out chatty squirrel like calls nearby I caught a Warbling vireo s burbling warbling song and then we were rewarded with great looks at a Nashville warbler a Wilson s warbler and a Magnolia warbler all fluttering about in the low shrubs for a few minutes And just like that within moments I forgot about the dire heat For a moment everything seemed in order exactly as it should be September is a wonderful but slightly melancholy month for me These are the last sightings we ll have of warblers before they make their perilous journey south A good bye of sorts And yet this year I m seeing more I m recognizing a few more songs I m noticing a few more plumage details It s slow this birding knowledge acquisition but it s marvellous A year ago I couldn t have told you a bird was wren like and I certainly wouldn t have thought to pay attention to a greyish drab warbling vireo s bright eyestripe that now looks to me like rebellious eye shadow and brings me right back to those trips to the mall in 7th grade and all those unfortunate but oh so earnest experiments in make up Is it wrong to see myself in these birds To recognize pieces of my life Because perhaps what s happening is that birds have unexpectedly completely unintentionally turned into an inextricable part of me In other good news a piece I wrote about migratory restlessness Zugunruhe both birdy and personal has been long listed for the CBC Creative Nonfiction award Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing on September 6 2015 by Julia Zarankin Back from the land of Arctic Terns by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply Dearest Birdiest Readers I m back from two weeks in Iceland and am trying to figure out how to readjust to Toronto life where the weather doesn t change drastically every couple of hours where the northern light doesn t blind you at 8pm in late August where I can t sip a delicious latte in a cowshed cafe Yes you read those last words correctly We discovered Iceland s best cafe located in a bona fide cowshed about 10 km south of Akureyri Where else in the world could we sip lattes and eat waffles with fresh cream whilst surrounded by 200 cows going about their somewhat smelly business We even watched the milking process via webcam and it was nothing short of riveting yes our portion of the cafe was glassed in Here are the lovelies at KaffiKu Not your usual coffee shop Many great black backed gulls flying overhead above the barn It s not easy to readjust to a landscape with trees with more than one lane of traffic with crowds of people I seemed to have no problem getting used to the miles of lava fields volcanic rock covered in thick moss and to the near constant crisply harsh sounds of arctic terns overhead I miss being surrounded by ocean I miss the omnipresent geothermal swimming pools we tried out eight different ones if you re planning a trip to Iceland I have plenty of advice I miss the delicious vinarbraud custard and almond croissants of which I consumed at least two every single day I miss the herring sadly we didn t make it to the national herring museum I miss the colossal sky and fabulously fickle weather I miss Icelandic non nonsense ways and absence of garrulous often meaningless politeness I miss it all Perhaps if I m being brutally honest I also miss being on vacation In birdier news I was proud of my modest ID skills that I managed to exercise we saw Kittiwakes Oystercatchers White wagtails a gazillion great back backed gulls and shore birds of every persuasion but I was scope less not to mention skill less in the shore bird department and couldn t ID much of anything I studied the birds I knew and contented myself with that I did have one unexpected birdy experience While visiting Halldor Laxness house museum Gljufrasteinn I happened on the most lovely sight in his bedroom Right there on the windowsill across from his bed lay a pair of Zeiss binoculars which Laxness used every single day of his life I was alone in the museum and probably proceeded to do something semi legal I picked up the binoculars and took a look through his mid century Zeiss optics to catch a glimpse of the world his ancestral hills mountains and fields exactly as Halldor Laxness saw it And to think that five years ago I wouldn t have even noticed the binoculars they would have meant as little to me as the religious paraphernalia on the bedside table Halldor Laxness Zeiss binoculars Gljufrasteinn museum How delightfully strange life is How miraculously unexpected its twists and turns Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Uncategorized on August 30 2015 by Julia Zarankin Meanwhile with birds by Julia Zarankin Leave a reply It s been hard to find the words Or rather I ve been searching for and sifting through words about my relationship with birds elsewhere of late If anything comes of my meandering thoughts I ll let you know So we ll save the big picture discussions for another time and I ll let you know what s been happening in the meanwhile Where to begin I could tell you about my catastrophic ID experience a few weeks ago wherein I accidentally called a Green heron a Hummingbird yes I did admit that the hummingbird seemed exceedingly large for some

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/author/birdsandwords/ (2015-09-25)
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  • Beginnings of Fall | Birds and Words
    Catbird Dumetella carolinensis let out chatty squirrel like calls nearby I caught a Warbling vireo s burbling warbling song and then we were rewarded with great looks at a Nashville warbler a Wilson s warbler and a Magnolia warbler all fluttering about in the low shrubs for a few minutes And just like that within moments I forgot about the dire heat For a moment everything seemed in order exactly as it should be September is a wonderful but slightly melancholy month for me These are the last sightings we ll have of warblers before they make their perilous journey south A good bye of sorts And yet this year I m seeing more I m recognizing a few more songs I m noticing a few more plumage details It s slow this birding knowledge acquisition but it s marvellous A year ago I couldn t have told you a bird was wren like and I certainly wouldn t have thought to pay attention to a greyish drab warbling vireo s bright eyestripe that now looks to me like rebellious eye shadow and brings me right back to those trips to the mall in 7th grade and all those unfortunate but oh so earnest experiments in make up Is it wrong to see myself in these birds To recognize pieces of my life Because perhaps what s happening is that birds have unexpectedly completely unintentionally turned into an inextricable part of me In other good news a piece I wrote about migratory restlessness Zugunruhe both birdy and personal has been long listed for the CBC Creative Nonfiction award Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Birding Life seeing on September 6 2015 by Julia Zarankin Post navigation Back from the land of Arctic Terns And Just Like That Click on a tab to select how you d like to leave your comment Birds and Words Twitter Facebook Google Login Login Login Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em i q cite s strike strong Notify me of follow up comments by email Notify me of new posts by email Search for On the Coyot es Network Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Coyote Crossing Published on September 19 2015 by Chris Clarke My Hit Single Are Warblers Less Important Than Tigers Reconciliation Ecology Published on September 12 2015 by Madhusudan Katti Making Friends With Crows The Corvid Blog Published on August 2 2015 by The Corvid Blog The Heart of Freedom Cecil the Lion Wild Within Published on July 29 2015 by Jennifer Molidor There s Gold in Them Hills Dispersal Range Published on June 28 2015 by Meera Lee Sethi California note 1 Slow Water Movement Published on July

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/2015/09/06/beginnings-of-fall/ (2015-09-25)
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  • Back from the land of Arctic Terns | Birds and Words
    miss the colossal sky and fabulously fickle weather I miss Icelandic non nonsense ways and absence of garrulous often meaningless politeness I miss it all Perhaps if I m being brutally honest I also miss being on vacation In birdier news I was proud of my modest ID skills that I managed to exercise we saw Kittiwakes Oystercatchers White wagtails a gazillion great back backed gulls and shore birds of every persuasion but I was scope less not to mention skill less in the shore bird department and couldn t ID much of anything I studied the birds I knew and contented myself with that I did have one unexpected birdy experience While visiting Halldor Laxness house museum Gljufrasteinn I happened on the most lovely sight in his bedroom Right there on the windowsill across from his bed lay a pair of Zeiss binoculars which Laxness used every single day of his life I was alone in the museum and probably proceeded to do something semi legal I picked up the binoculars and took a look through his mid century Zeiss optics to catch a glimpse of the world his ancestral hills mountains and fields exactly as Halldor Laxness saw it And to think that five years ago I wouldn t have even noticed the binoculars they would have meant as little to me as the religious paraphernalia on the bedside table Halldor Laxness Zeiss binoculars Gljufrasteinn museum How delightfully strange life is How miraculously unexpected its twists and turns Share this More Email Press This Share on Tumblr Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Uncategorized on August 30 2015 by Julia Zarankin Post navigation Meanwhile with birds Beginnings of Fall Click on a tab to select how you d like to leave your comment Birds and Words Twitter Facebook Google Login Login Login Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em i q cite s strike strong Notify me of follow up comments by email Notify me of new posts by email Search for On the Coyot es Network Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Coyote Crossing Published on September 19 2015 by Chris Clarke My Hit Single Are Warblers Less Important Than Tigers Reconciliation Ecology Published on September 12 2015 by Madhusudan Katti Making Friends With Crows The Corvid Blog Published on August 2 2015 by The Corvid Blog The Heart of Freedom Cecil the Lion Wild Within Published on July 29 2015 by Jennifer Molidor There s Gold in Them Hills Dispersal Range Published on June 28 2015 by Meera Lee Sethi California note 1 Slow Water Movement Published on July 7 2015 by slowwatermovement Joe Eaton calls Fowl A Review Toad In The Hole Published on July 4 2015 by Joe Eaton The other invisible

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/birdsandwords/2015/08/30/back-from-the-land-of-arctic-terns/ (2015-09-25)
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