archive-es.com » ES » C » COYOT.ES

Total: 581

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • The Wilds of California | Coyote Crossing
    Hole Published on July 4 2015 by Joe Eaton The other invisible hand View from Elephant Hills Published on 5 June 2015 by T R Shankar Raman The Silurian Valley spared but will it be conserved Miracle or Mirage Published on December 5 2014 by Patrick Donnelly Lone Pine s lone pine Is Dead InyoOwnWay Published on August 13 2014 by Mike Prather A Good Defense Is Not Enough The Not Essential List Published on August 18 2013 by Shaun G Nevada Part 2 Basin and Range Watch Published on July 17 2013 by Basin and Range Watch Recent Posts Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist And this is his sofa is it Let Er Drift Louis Sahagun makes it into the Joshua Tree book Moon s up Recent Comments cithra on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist katrinkavt on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist chigau on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Dale Favier on And this is his sofa is it eamon knight on Social media isn t Get my free email newsletter Enter your email address powered by TinyLetter On Twitter Tweets by canislatrans Feeds RSS Posts RSS Comments My writing at Beacon Napping In the Belly Of The King August 27 2015 The Central Valley s Second Coming May 27 2015 The Desert Is Not Your Blank Canvas April 19 2015 Cynicism and Sentiment In The Desert February 17 2015 Coyote Hunting January 14 2015 What Kind Of Jerk Kills Coyotes For Fun December 10 2014 Permanence December 5 2014 My writing at KCET You Can Help Clean Up Ocean Plastic on Coastal Cleanup Day September 18 2015 It s Up To You to Keep Your Home Fire Safe Here s How September

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/2012/11/30/the-wilds-of-california/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Video | Coyote Crossing
    about birds than I do in my entire body has this reaction A golden eagle tries to snatch a baby in Montreal and the video goes viral But it s faked Golden Eagle is a scarce visitor in the Montreal area but the bird in the video is not a Golden Eagle nor anything else that occurs in the wild in North America This was clearly a setup using a falconer s bird and probably a fake toddler for the distant scene With all the ignorance about nature that s out there already the last thing we need is this kind of stupid garbage Share this Email Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Natural History Video and tagged eagle ecological niches needing to be filled predation Video Wildlife on December 18 2012 by Chris Clarke The Wilds of California by Chris Clarke Leave a reply The wonderfully talented San Diego area filmmaker Jim Karnik has an ambitious project in mind an hour long film that will introduce viewers to Californian biodiversity in all the varying ecosystems the state has to offer from coastal tidepools to alpine rock and ice This trailer is amazing Jim s got an Indiegogo site set up and as soon as I get my December budget figured out I m kicking something in Check it out and see if you want to as well Share this Email Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Video and tagged biodiversity Botany Desert film National Parks Science on November 30 2012 by Chris Clarke Search for On the Coyot es Network On Forgetting My Field Guide Birds and Words Published on September 16 2015 by Julia Zarankin My Hit Single Are Warblers Less Important Than Tigers Reconciliation Ecology Published on September 12 2015 by Madhusudan Katti Making Friends With Crows The Corvid Blog Published on August 2 2015 by The Corvid Blog The Heart of Freedom Cecil the Lion Wild Within Published on July 29 2015 by Jennifer Molidor There s Gold in Them Hills Dispersal Range Published on June 28 2015 by Meera Lee Sethi California note 1 Slow Water Movement Published on July 7 2015 by slowwatermovement Joe Eaton calls Fowl A Review Toad In The Hole Published on July 4 2015 by Joe Eaton The other invisible hand View from Elephant Hills Published on 5 June 2015 by T R Shankar Raman The Silurian Valley spared but will it be conserved Miracle or Mirage Published on December 5 2014 by Patrick Donnelly Lone Pine s lone pine Is Dead InyoOwnWay Published on August 13 2014 by Mike Prather A Good Defense Is Not Enough The Not Essential List Published on August 18 2013 by Shaun G Nevada Part 2 Basin and Range Watch Published on July 17 2013 by Basin and Range Watch Recent Posts Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist And this is his sofa is it Let Er Drift Louis Sahagun makes it into the Joshua

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/category/video/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • biodiversity | Coyote Crossing
    hand View from Elephant Hills Published on 5 June 2015 by T R Shankar Raman The Silurian Valley spared but will it be conserved Miracle or Mirage Published on December 5 2014 by Patrick Donnelly Lone Pine s lone pine Is Dead InyoOwnWay Published on August 13 2014 by Mike Prather A Good Defense Is Not Enough The Not Essential List Published on August 18 2013 by Shaun G Nevada Part 2 Basin and Range Watch Published on July 17 2013 by Basin and Range Watch Recent Posts Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist And this is his sofa is it Let Er Drift Louis Sahagun makes it into the Joshua Tree book Moon s up Recent Comments cithra on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist katrinkavt on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist chigau on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Dale Favier on And this is his sofa is it eamon knight on Social media isn t Get my free email newsletter Enter your email address powered by TinyLetter On Twitter Tweets by canislatrans Feeds RSS Posts RSS Comments My writing at Beacon Napping In the Belly Of The King August 27 2015 The Central Valley s Second Coming May 27 2015 The Desert Is Not Your Blank Canvas April 19 2015 Cynicism and Sentiment In The Desert February 17 2015 Coyote Hunting January 14 2015 What Kind Of Jerk Kills Coyotes For Fun December 10 2014 Permanence December 5 2014 My writing at KCET You Can Help Clean Up Ocean Plastic on Coastal Cleanup Day September 18 2015 It s Up To You to Keep Your Home Fire Safe Here s How September 17 2015 7 Things You Need To Know About El Niño and

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/tag/biodiversity/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The fleeting idea of permanence | Coyote Crossing
    magazines The desert ironwood and its cousins are the ecological foundation of the Sonoran Desert Remove them and the rest of the plants and animals in the desert would likely vanish as well If you re a plant that wants to survive in the desert it s a good idea to sink your roots under a desert ironwood or one of its cousins Shade is one reason as sparse as a bean tree s leaves generally are they re better than nothing at all Then there s the heat and the humidity even droughty desert legumes exhale a little bit of water through their leaves and their loss is your gain Higher relative humidity due to the bean tree means you ll transpire less water yourself There s the simple fact of shelter germinate under a bean tree and it s less likely that browsing animals will find you and eat you Leguminous thorns also help protect young plants Nitrogen from shed leaves is augmented by that excreted by birds and other small animals who come for shade shelter or nutritious bean seeds The shade beneath the trees is optimal habitat for cacti Each majestic saguaro each venerable multi stemmed organ pipe each white bearded senita you see on your travels to the desert quite likely got its start beneath one of the region s legumes Remove the trees as happens when a subdivision goes in or wood is cut for the burgeoning gourmet mesquite charcoal industry or the bosque burns after an invasion of exotic buffelgrass ups the fuel load and you close down the nurseries from which new generations of column cacti are fledged With this in mind Bill Clinton in one of his final acts in office established a bit less than 130 000 acres of the Sonoran Desert as the Ironwood Forest National Monument Desert ironwood trees tend toward far longer lives than do mesquites or palos verdes One live tree near Tucson has been carbon dated at 1200 years old 300 years is a fairly probable average life expectancy Even after dying the tree can provide an oasis of shade in the desert for an immense stretch of time The wood is in the words of A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert Stephen J Phillips and Patricia Wentworth Comus eds Arizona Sonora Desert Museum UC Press 2000 rich in toxic chemicals and essentially non biodegradable Once ironwood dies nothing eats it though I ve seen termites making stalwart attempts Firewood sized chunks found in desert washes have been determined to be 1600 years old A standing snag may after its death provide valuable habitat for a thousand years This knowledge gained after I collected the few pieces of wood now sitting on my writing desk does not exactly fill me with an uncomplicated sense of joy in acquisition The year that Becky and I were married we drove south to an un named valley near Blythe a small river town in the middle of the Colorado Desert California s subsection of the Sonoran Desert There we camped for the night in a grove of Olneya tesota The valley was bleak indeed It was October far from the hottest part of the year and yet we saw little in the way of vertebrate life during the day A house sparrow that had probably strayed from the alfalfa fields flitted briefly into the ironwood canopy then returned eastward Other than that I don t recall seeing so much as a lizard Not a creature stirred the desiccated husks of summer annuals the pallid leaves of desert ironwood and palo verde All was silent This was driven home when eyes on the desert pavement at my feet I absently muttered something to Becky She replied with a tone of amusement I looked up to see we were at least two hundred yards apart yet we could hear each other s normal speaking voices perfectly That afternoon I found a comfortable looking spot in the wash shaded by a bit of ironwood and laid down for a nap shifting my back to gouge out a depression in the gravel I opened my eyes for a moment saw nothing but a few ironwood leaves silhouetted against an impossibly blue sky then dozed Not a few minutes later something soft brushed my cheek and I started awake Eyes the color of polished ironwood gleamed Becky had kissed me The image of my wife s face bean tree leaves behind her deep blue firmament framing all would prove to haunt me through months of desultory wood carving Things picked up a bit when the sun went down A wind came up from the south bearing the slightest odor of the Sea of Cortez Zeke our dog noticed a desert packrat or two whose stick homes we had missed among the fallen trees Far off coyote song punctured the twilight the local great horned owl providing a bass line After dark the valley was palpably alive I sat by a fire We were far remote there was an abundance of dead wood in the wash and I wanted a fire so the first two clauses in this sentence seemed sufficient justification Ironwood burns hot A pile of fuel the size of a regulation softball and we couldn t get closer than ten feet to the blaze With wood like that you don t need much fire The next morning half the small pile of scraps I d collected lay unburned next to the coals I grabbed a few and put them in the truck They ve sat near my computer since then I pick up one of the larger pieces now a rough splintery crescent a foot long four or five inches wide at its thickest It looks weathered old rotten yet it weighs at least three pounds I heft the wood in my hand I can t be sure this stick is a millennium and a half old but I can

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/2011/04/19/the-fleeting-idea-of-permanence/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cephalocereus apicephalium | Coyote Crossing
    28 2015 by Meera Lee Sethi California note 1 Slow Water Movement Published on July 7 2015 by slowwatermovement Joe Eaton calls Fowl A Review Toad In The Hole Published on July 4 2015 by Joe Eaton The other invisible hand View from Elephant Hills Published on 5 June 2015 by T R Shankar Raman The Silurian Valley spared but will it be conserved Miracle or Mirage Published on December 5 2014 by Patrick Donnelly Lone Pine s lone pine Is Dead InyoOwnWay Published on August 13 2014 by Mike Prather A Good Defense Is Not Enough The Not Essential List Published on August 18 2013 by Shaun G Nevada Part 2 Basin and Range Watch Published on July 17 2013 by Basin and Range Watch Recent Posts Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist And this is his sofa is it Let Er Drift Louis Sahagun makes it into the Joshua Tree book Moon s up Recent Comments cithra on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist katrinkavt on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist chigau on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Dale Favier on And this is his sofa is it eamon knight on Social media isn t Get my free email newsletter Enter your email address powered by TinyLetter On Twitter Tweets by canislatrans Feeds RSS Posts RSS Comments My writing at Beacon Napping In the Belly Of The King August 27 2015 The Central Valley s Second Coming May 27 2015 The Desert Is Not Your Blank Canvas April 19 2015 Cynicism and Sentiment In The Desert February 17 2015 Coyote Hunting January 14 2015 What Kind Of Jerk Kills Coyotes For Fun December 10 2014 Permanence December 5 2014 My writing at KCET You

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/2009/03/27/cephalocereus-apicephalium/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • There’s no such thing as desertification | Coyote Crossing
    established The problem is that actual deserts are the lands most threatened by what environmentalists call desertification invasive weeds are raging through the deserts like the wildfires they spawn water diversions cause subsidence and old tree death and dust storms are more common in the Mojave now than they were during the Dust Bowl To call this sterilizing of land desertification is to reinforce the notion that deserts are worthless damaged things to be avoided mended or improved upon and certainly not places worth preserving when the alternative is cozying up to Big Green Energy Most chillingly the remedy for desertified lands is usually referred to as reclamation Reclaiming the desert they call it Here is a photo of a reclaimed desert landscape Here s another And another Share this Email Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged Botany Climate Geology Politics Science on February 16 2009 by Chris Clarke Post navigation Thrillcraft The threat of motorized recreation Keep ORVs out of NV wilderness areas 6 thoughts on There s no such thing as desertification Rana Ravens February 16 2009 at 10 53 pm This is an amazing post Chris a perfect mix of images and words It says something about how this language is insidious and pervasive that I a person who knows and loves a variety of desert areas hadn t made the connection between desertification and desert let alone the way such language makes it difficult for us to perceive the transformation of desert into desertified land if it starts out as desert and is desertified has anything changed the language suggests that the answer is No Lots to think on here James February 17 2009 at 7 01 am Beautifully written and illustrated post Perhaps you hit on the right word for what environmentalists are talking about sterilization I ve taken many trips through the desert country and loved every mile I ve also stopped into Vegas a few times and it always breaks my heart a little bit to think of how its water needs are destroying such beautiful places The Bellagio fountains are supposed to be reclaimed desert as they say It looks dead to me Wren February 17 2009 at 8 29 am Good point Chris It s not to our advantage to use the same terminology for two very different things You ve neglected my personal favorite golf courses in the middle of the desert Followed by complaints that sand blows on to the greens vance Dubberly February 17 2009 at 10 07 am Good argument and point Though I must admit I m a bit bummed I was hoping we could desertify LA Though ultimately it s already pretty barren Lilian Nattel February 17 2009 at 12 42 pm Eloquent photos And language matters too Sterilization is a good word and more accurate BillW February 17 2009 at 6 14 pm Yep Language shapes perception I ve long been suspicious of desertification as being anything other

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/2009/02/16/theres-no-such-thing-as-desertification/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Geology | Coyote Crossing
    for desertified lands is usually referred to as reclamation Reclaiming the desert they call it Here is a photo of a reclaimed desert landscape Here s another And another Share this Email Like this Like Loading This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged Botany Climate Geology Politics Science on February 16 2009 by Chris Clarke Desert Bones by Chris Clarke Despite its dangerous reputation among non physicists the typical uranium atom is only weakly radioactive More than 99 percent of the uranium found in nature consists of the isotope U 238 whose atomic nucleus contains 92 protons and 146 neutrons The laws of physics make this a very stable configuration with a half life of 4 46 billion years In other words it takes four and a half billion years for half of the sample of U238 you hold in your hand to decay U 235 with 143 neutrons is far more radioactive it has a half life of just 704 million years Anti nuclear activists among whose number I count myself will often view these long half life statistics with alarm as they imply the material being discussed will be radioactive for a mind bogglingly long time And that s true For your handful of U 238 to become completely non radioactive you d need to wait maybe eleven times longer than the universe has existed so far But very long half lives mean relatively low radioactivity Stable isotopes have the longest half lives of all at infinity and change It s the stuff with the short half lives you have to watch out for Out in the desert the naturally occurring uranium mixed in with minerals such as zircons and apatites and such is approximately as dangerous as lead You wouldn t want to refine it and pour it on your cornflakes but if you did the heavy metal poisoning would get you long before the radiation would U 235 is a different matter it s what they make the bombs and nuclear power plants out of U 235 spits out around seven times as much radiation as its heavier sibling and is thus radioactive enough to support a self sustaining chain reaction U 238 isn t Of course if you really want radioactive danger you turn to something like plutonium 239 which decays something like 200 000 times faster than U 238 But U 238 does decay and it does so at a known and predictable rate Each decaying nucleus emits an alpha particle a clump of two neutrons and two protons a k a a helium atom without its shell of electrons to begin a cascade of decay becoming one new unstable isotope after another as the nucleus tries to reach equilibrium The first alpha emission transmutes the atom into thorium 234 which has a half life of 24 days The thorium 234 nucleus emits a beta particle turning a neutron into a proton and raising its atomic number by one and thus becomes protactinium 234 Protactinium 234 emits another beta particle to become the highly radioactive uranium 234 which emits an alpha particle to become thorium 230 Thorium begets radium radium begets radon Fourteen transmutations in a cascade that can take a minute or millions of years bring the decayed U 238 atom at long last to stable lead 32 nucleons lighter Eight alpha particles lighter When that decaying atom is part of a larger hunk of rock each of those departing alpha particles tears through the surrounding rock The particle ionizes many of the molecules it passes slowing down with each encounter until it finally comes to rest a few micrometers from its parent nucleus That parent nucleus recoils like a rifle doing a bit of ionizing of its neighbors as well The result is a tiny ionized tunnel sometimes as long as a thousandth of an inch through the surrounding rock Each ionized molecule is repelled from its newly ionized like charged neighbors and the tunnel widens a bit If that tunnel or fission track is in a piece of rock of more or less uniform characteristics a crystal say or a bit of volcanic glass to provide a little bit of uniform background you could see the tracks with a cheap microscope Zircon often has a significant amount of U 238 in it So do obsidian and mica and titanite Apatite a class of phosphate minerals that together make up one of the most common substances in the earth s crust is another mineral that reliably contains uranium Each of these minerals displays fission tracks rather nicely Researchers will polish and etch a surface train a microscope on it and count the tracks Apatites are interesting for a number of reasons Our bones it turns out are a sophisticated composite material consisting of organic fibers and apatite nanocrystals Bone apatite less resistant to acid than fluoroapatites which is why dentists encourage us all to substitute fluorine atoms for the hydroxyl or carbonate ions in the apatites in our teeth Fluoroapatites also have less tensile strength than do the apatites in our bones which is why people with lots of fluorine in their groundwater have more hip fractures later in life Apatite is a source of phosphorus for industrial fertilizer and those of you who are alive when we run short on available phosphorus probably in about thirty years will probably see the price of apatite skyrocket as lots of people starve Peak Phosphorus will mandate organic agriculture the way Peak Oil will mandate bicycling Apatite also does something interesting when its temperature begins to approach the boiling point of water its crystalline structure relaxes ever so slightly It begins at around 70 C 158 F small imperfections scratches and gaps in the mineral begin to smooth over Tiny little flaws in the rock fission tracks included are annealed Eventually they vanish The higher the temperature the faster the annealing at about 400 C some apatites anneal their fission tracks in the

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/tag/geology/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ferocactus on Lava | Coyote Crossing
    on 5 June 2015 by T R Shankar Raman The Silurian Valley spared but will it be conserved Miracle or Mirage Published on December 5 2014 by Patrick Donnelly Lone Pine s lone pine Is Dead InyoOwnWay Published on August 13 2014 by Mike Prather A Good Defense Is Not Enough The Not Essential List Published on August 18 2013 by Shaun G Nevada Part 2 Basin and Range Watch Published on July 17 2013 by Basin and Range Watch Recent Posts Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist And this is his sofa is it Let Er Drift Louis Sahagun makes it into the Joshua Tree book Moon s up Recent Comments cithra on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist katrinkavt on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist chigau on Some reasons I have been called a radical environmentalist Dale Favier on And this is his sofa is it eamon knight on Social media isn t Get my free email newsletter Enter your email address powered by TinyLetter On Twitter Tweets by canislatrans Feeds RSS Posts RSS Comments My writing at Beacon Napping In the Belly Of The King August 27 2015 The Central Valley s Second Coming May 27 2015 The Desert Is Not Your Blank Canvas April 19 2015 Cynicism and Sentiment In The Desert February 17 2015 Coyote Hunting January 14 2015 What Kind Of Jerk Kills Coyotes For Fun December 10 2014 Permanence December 5 2014 My writing at KCET You Can Help Clean Up Ocean Plastic on Coastal Cleanup Day September 18 2015 It s Up To You to Keep Your Home Fire Safe Here s How September 17 2015 7 Things You Need To Know About El Niño and the Drought September 10 2015 California

    Original URL path: http://coyot.es/crossing/2009/02/08/ferocactus-on-lava/ (2015-09-25)
    Open archived version from archive